Blog November 2018

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Workplace Violence

Posted On: November 21, 2018

Workplace Violence 

Employees may experience physical injury and/or psychological trauma due to workplace violence, such as assault. According to OSHA, approximately 2 million American workers are victims of workplace violence each year.[1] Certain professions have a higher risk of workplace violence, including police and corrections officers, healthcare workers, social workers, taxi and delivery drivers, and late-night retail workers (e.g. gas station attendants). 

Workplace violence includes not only physical violence, but also the threat of physical violence, harassment or intimidation. 

Workplace violence is divided into 4 categories based on the relationship of the assailant to the victim:

  • Criminal intent: “violent acts by people who enter the workplace to commit robbery or other crime – or current or former employee who enters the workplace with the intent to commit a crime.”
  • Customer, client and patient: “violence directed at employees by customers, clients, patients, students, inmates or any others to whom the employer provides a service.”
  • Co-worker: “violence against co-workers, supervisors, or managers by a current or former employee, supervisor, or manager.”
  • Personal: “violence in the workplace by someone who does not work there, but who is known to, or has a personal relationships with, an employee.”[2]

 

Feel free to contact the law offices of Gilbert, Blaszcyk & Milburn for a free consultation on your possible claim. 

[1] https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/workplaceviolence/


[2] OSHA, Workplace Violence Prevention, https://www.osha.gov/dte/grant_materials/fy10/sh-20865-10/08_workplace_violence_2012.ppt

 

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Falls at Work

Posted On: November 07, 2018

Falls at Work 

Same-Level Falls are the second most common workers’ compensation claim in New York, according to Liberty Mutual’s 2017 Workplace Safety Index.[1] 

Examples of a same-level fall include: an employee falling on ice or another slippery surface such as a soapy floor, tripping on a computer wire, falling due to an uneven working surface, or being knocked to the floor by a piece of equipment. No matter how an employee sustained a fall, he/she is entitled to benefits as long as the incident occurred on the job. 

The fall can occur anywhere from an office to the sidewalk to a roof. These falls can result in concussion; fractures; broken bones; cuts, abrasions and bruises; shoulder, neck, head, back, knee, and internal organ injuries. 

Falls to a lower level are a leading cause of work-related injuries. These injuries can occur when a worker falls off scaffolding or a ladder, or down stairs. These falls can cause cuts, bruises, abrasions, sprains and broken bones, and concussions. Construction and maintenance workers are at particularly high risk for falls from heights.

For more information about being represented by our law office, please contact us today. When you reach out, we can provide you with a free, no-obligation consultation.

[1] https://www.libertymutualgroup.com/about-liberty-mutual-site/news-site/Pages/2017-Liberty-Mutual-Workplace-Safety-Index.aspx

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